Issac Asimov on reading:

I don’t believe in personal immortality; the only way I expect to have some version of such a thing is through my books.
I write for the same reason I breathe – because if I didn’t, I would die.
I am not a speed reader. I am a speed understander.
If my doctor told me I had only six minutes to live, I wouldn’t brood. I’d type a little faster.
Self-education is, I firmly believe, the only kind of education there is.
The true delight is in the finding out rather than in the knowing.
“I received the fundamentals of my education in school, but that was not enough. My real education, the superstructure, the details, the true architecture, I got out of the public library. For an impoverished child whose family could not afford to buy books, the library was the open door to wonder and achievement, and I can never be sufficiently grateful that I had the wit to charge through that door and make the most of it. Now, when I read constantly about the way in which library funds are being cut and cut, I can only think that the door is closing and that American society has found one more way to destroy itself.”

Terry Pratchett on books:

“If you have enough book space, I don’t want to talk to you.”

“A good bookshop is just a genteel Black Hole that knows how to read.” -Guards, Guards!   

The three rules of the Librarians of Time and Space are: 1) Silence; 2) Books must be returned by no later than the date shown; and 3) Do not interfere with the nature of causality.” –Guards, Guards!

“If you don’t turn your life into a story, you just become a part of someone else’s story.”    -The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents

“Aziraphale collected books. If he were totally honest with himself he would have to have admitted that his bookshop was simply somewhere to store them. He was not unusual in this. In order to maintain his cover as a typical second-hand book seller, he used every means short of actual physical violence to prevent customers from making a purchase. Unpleasant damp smells, glowering looks, erratic opening hours – he was incredibly good at it.”    -Good Omens

“This was not a fairy-tale castle and there was no such thing as a fairy-tale ending, but sometimes you could threaten to kick the handsome prince in the ham-and-eggs.”    -Monstrous Regiment

“In theory it was, around now, Literature. Susan hated Literature. She’d much prefer to read a good book.”    -Soul Music

“A lot of the stories were highly suspicious, in her opinion. There was the one that ended when the two good children pushed the wicked witch into her own oven…Stories like this stopped people thinking properly, she was sure. She’d read that one and thought, Excuse me? No one has an oven big enough to get a whole person in, and what made the children think they could just walk around eating people’s houses in any case? And why does some boy too stupid to know a cow is worth a lot more than five beans have the right to murder a giant and steal all his gold? Not to mention commit an act of ecological vandalism? And some girl who can’t tell the difference between a wolf and her grandmother must either have been as dense as teak or come from an extremely ugly family.”

“It looked like the sort of book described in library catalogues as “slightly foxed”, although it would be more honest to admit that it looked as though it had beed badgered, wolved and possibly beared as well.
— Ah, but has it been hedgehogged?”

“There’s no such thing as writer’s block. That was invented by people in California who couldn’t write.”

“People flock in, nevertheless, in search of answers to those questions only librarians are considered to be able to answer, such as “Is this the laundry?” “How do you spell surreptitious?” and, on a regular basis, “Do you have a book I remember reading once? It had a red cover and it turned out they were twins.”    -Going Postal

“But there was more to it than that.  As the Amazing Maurice said, it was just a story about people and rats.  And the difficult part of it was deciding who the people were, and who were the rats.”  –The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents

“The librarians were mysterious. It was said they could tell what book you needed just by looking at you, and they could take your voice away with a word.” –Wintersmith

“Books must be treated with respect, we feel that in our bones, because words have power. Bring enough words together they can bend space and time.”

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Reading one book is like eating one potato chip.

Don’t be afraid to make corrections! Whether the voice came from her memory or was a last whisper from the blinding new star far above, Nita never knew. But she knew what to do. While Kit was still on the first part of the name she pulled out her pen, her best pen that Fred had saved and changed. She clicked it open. The metal still tingled against her skin, the ink at the point still glittered oddly- the same glitter as the ink with which the bright Book was written. Nita bent quickly over the Book and with the pen, in lines of light, drew from the final circle an arrow pointing up-ward, the way out, the symbol that said change could happen- if, only if-

Nita stood still, listening to Joanne’s footsteps hurrying away, a little faster every second- and slowly began to realize that she’d gotten what she asked for too- the ability to break the cycle of anger and loneliness, not necessarily for others, but at least for herself. It wouldn’t even take the Speech; plain words would do it, and the magic of reaching out. It would take a long time, much longer then something simple like breaking the walls of the worlds, and it would cost more effort than even reading the Book of Night with Moon. But it would be worth it- and eventually it would work. A spell always works. Nita went home.

So You Want to Be a Wizard by Diane Duane

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Jenny Calendar: “You’re here again? You kids really dig the library, don’t
you?”
Buffy Summers: “We’re literary.”
Xander Harris: “To read makes our speaking
English good.”

Jenny Calendar:   Honestly, what is it about them that bothers you so much?
Rupert Giles:   The smell.
Jenny Calendar:   Computers don’t smell, Rupert.
Rupert Giles:   I know. Smell is the most powerful trigger to the memory there is. A certain flower, or a-a whiff of smoke can bring up experiences long forgotten. Books smell musty and-and-and rich. The knowledge gained from a computer is a – it, uh, it has no-no texture, no-no context. It’s-it’s there and then it’s gone. If it’s to last, then-then the getting of knowledge should be, uh, tangible, it should be, um, smelly.

-“I Robot, You Jane” Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Testing, 1, 2, 3…

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Mr. Koreander: Your books are safe. While you’re reading them, you get to become Tarzan or Robinson Crusoe.
Bastian: But that’s what I like about ’em.
Mr. Koreander: Ahh, but afterwards you get to be a little boy again.
Bastian: Wh-what do you mean?
Mr. Koreander: Listen. Have you ever been Captain Nemo, trapped inside your submarine while the giant squid is attacking you?
Bastian: Yes.
Mr. Koreander: Weren’t you afraid you couldn’t escape?
Bastian: But it’s only a story.
Mr. Koreander: That’s what I’m talking about. The ones you read are safe.
Bastian: And that one isn’t?

The Neverending Story